RSS

Egypt, Morsi and dictatorship (some words from Pakistan)

07 Dec

Let me start by saying I blame Morsi,….

What Egypt is going through is exactly what happens when dictatorships fall. One feels like after years of stability we are entering a destructive era. Tensions and temperatures increase, every system appears to be crumbling and people are ready to fight each other. Suddenly ones who never thought of speaking, because they were not allowed to speak, start shouting. They want to tell what they think, …….

it’s ugly but that’s what happens when a prisoner after spending years in dark cell comes out, he feels he got blind. Freedom is weird, angry beast, but it is most beautiful one also.

So I am not too disappointed from Egypt’s situation, because unlike Iran where people just resistance against theocracy in name of revolution never took root, here we can see that people are eager to protect it.

What Egyptian people are going through is what nations go through when rebuilding, everyone has it’s own dream how new house should look like. Unfortunately instead of having these discussions  in the rooms, coffee houses they are having these discussions on streets. Because their experience tells them that unless roads are not blocked no one listens. (like in Pakistan, where unless tires, sometimes with car on them, are not burned  no one takes notice). Again it is unfortunate byproduct of the dictatorship.

Now why I blame Morsi, well simply because his actions are unlawful (as per my knowledge of Egyptian law). Whatever be the hindsight, whatever be the good end and good intentions be. He is wrong, He should not have done that. When I first heard of it, I felt ok he is trying to protect the constitution. But then one has to ask protect the constitutional assembly by unlawful act? One can ask what unlawful act? He has only declared himself above the reproach of Egyptian Court for just for small amount of time. Question is what stops him extending it? and What stops him from declaring something similar in future? Even if he is a good person with good intentions, he will be setting precedent. That’s what is scary.

Morsi says he wanted to protect the results of revolution, then he should have let the courts do what they thought was lawful. Their decision even if lawful, if had been against the popular feeling, would have resulted in more united resistance of people. Now he has taken away the right of people to argue for him. Now their arguments are based on rhetoric that he has good intentions, he had to protect revolution instead of some solid logic. And as Pakistani how many time I have not heard these logic  I cannot forget the day Gen. Musharraf unlawfully overtook government, I saw same arguments by my fellow countrymen, then when he removed judges first time, then when he did the referendum and then when removed judges second time sighting terrorism and danger to country.

What Morsi did is the modus operandi of dictators, which he does not want to be or atleast I wish he does not want to be. He should take a step back allowing judges do what they think is lawful, challenge their rulings, instead of assuming what they will do and setup precedent which future dictators will use.

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: